Dying to fit in

The wars, persecutions, and bloodshed, occasioned by religion, have generally turned on the most trifling differences in forms and ceremonies; which shews that it was not the vital interests of the questions that were at stake, but that these were made a handle and pretext to exercise cruelty and tyranny on the score of the most trivial and doubtful points of faith. When we compare it with other societies of the same kind, we are proud of its superiority, and mortified in some degree if it appears in any respect below them. When a man has bribed all the judges, the most unanimous decision of the court, though it may gain him his law-suit, cannot give him any assurance that he was in the right: and had he carried on his law-suit merely to satisfy himself that he was in the right, he never would have bribed the judges. It is dull; it palls on them. How, then, can we hope to get at them when they are hidden in the darkness of the remote past? There is, in the very feeling of those passions, something harsh, jarring, and convulsive, something that tears and distracts the breast, and is altogether destructive of that composure and tranquillity of mind which is so necessary to happiness, and which is best promoted by the contrary passions of gratitude and love. They retired silently to their cabins, and when, three days later, Pitale-Sharu returned to the village, no man challenged his action. As taste and good judgment, when they are considered as qualities which deserve praise and admiration, are supposed to imply a delicacy of sentiment and an acuteness of understanding not commonly to be met with; so the virtues of sensibility and self-command are not apprehended to consist in the ordinary, but in the uncommon degrees of those qualities. In 1824, in the case of King _v._ Williams (2 Barnewell & Cresswell, 528), some black-letter lawyer revived the forgotten iniquity for the benefit of a client dying to fit in in want of testimony, and demanded that the court should prescribe the number of conjurators necessary for the defence, but the court refused assistance, desiring to give the plaintiff the benefit of any mistake that might be made. Around the Coatepetl and on the shores of the Tollanatl—“the Water of Tula”—as the stream is called which laves the base of the hill, the mighty struggles of the gods took place which form the themes of almost all Aztec mythology. Lively sallies and connected discourse are very different things. About the year 400 Rufinus, in his account of his visit to the monks of the Nitrian desert, tells an adventure of the hermit Copres as related to him by that holy man himself. His agonies, when they are thus brought home to ourselves, when we have thus adopted and made them our own, begin at last to affect us, {10} and we then tremble and shudder at the thought of what he feels. He really adopts them. In many cases, an entirely separate house is required. It is true, there are cases, which require a very delicate, and conditional sort of superintendance, and that harsh measures and indiscriminate treatment would, in many instances, be more injurious than even absolute neglect; but at the same time, it must be observed, that such persons generally require to be placed under some judicious and delicate restraint, from the fact that their vicious inclination (for in these cases the disease begins in chronic inflammation and ultimately softening of the cerebellum) leading them into vicious habits, would rapidly accelerate the disease and make it a confirmed and incurable case. But it exists; and we are all happy when we find it. I shall wish, _ga nee_. And when the tinkling pendants sway and ring, ’Tis thou who in my heart dost move and sing. It is as easy to produce a _fac-simile_ of a table or a chair as to copy a picture, because these things do not stir from their places any more than the features of a portrait stir from theirs. It is a face which you would beware of rousing into anger or hostility, as you would beware of setting in motion some complicated and dangerous machinery. Nothing daunted, the enthusiastic saint then said that he would traverse the flames alone if the Soldan would bind himself, in the event of a triumphant result, to embrace the Christian religion and to force his subjects to follow the example. The librarian should say: Here is an unused book. It is the common error of the human mind, of forgetting the end in the means. Sir Joshua fell in love with one of his fair sitters, a young and beautiful girl, who ran out one day in a great panic and confusion, hid her face in her companion’s lap who was reading in an outer room, and said, ‘Sir Joshua had made her an offer!’ This circumstance perhaps deserves mentioning the more, because there is a general idea that Sir Joshua Reynolds was a confirmed old bachelor. It will not hinder his patron from giving him another living to play the petty tyrant in, or prevent him from riding over to the Squire’s in his carriage and being well received, or from sitting on the bench of Justices with due decorum and with clerical dignity. Nicholas Upton, writing in the middle of the fifteenth century, repeatedly alludes to the numerous cases in which he assisted as officer of the Earl of Salisbury, Lieutenant of the King of England; and in his chapters devoted to defining the different species of duel he betrays a singular confusion between the modern ideas of reparation of honor and the original object of judicial investigation, thus fairly illustrating the transitional character of the period.[772] It was about this time that Philippe le Bon, Duke of Burgundy, formally abolished the wager of battle, as far as lay in dying to fit in his power, throughout the extensive dominions of which he was sovereign, and in the Coutumier of Burgundy, as revised by him in 1459, there is no trace of it to be found. This is what is done by Hazlitt, for example, who, though he finds the essence of the laughable in the incongruous, defines the ludicrous as involving disappointment of expectation _by something having deformity or (something) inconvenient_, that is _what is contrary to the customary_ and desirable.[74] Herbert Spencer’s expression, a “descending incongruity,” is clearly a very similar mode of combining the principles.[75] Lipps’ theory of incongruity, with its distinction of a little, and a belittling presentation, might also, I think, easily be made to illustrate another mode of such combination. It was by this internal principle that the Fixed Stars revolved directly from east to west in circles parallel to the Equator, greater or less, according to their distance or nearness to the Poles, and with velocities so proportioned, {350} that each of them finished its diurnal period in the same time, in something less than twenty-three hours and fifty-six minutes. There are two different occasions upon which we examine our own conduct, and endeavour to view it in the light in which the impartial spectator would view it: first, when we are about to act; and secondly, after we have acted. This objection raised by Leslie Stephen to Massinger’s method of revealing a villain has great cogency; but I am inclined to believe that the cogency is due to a somewhat different reason from that which Leslie Stephen assigns. In the East, however, it has continued in use. This primary position would pretty certainly be specially favourable to the utterance of a certain kind of sound, let us say that commonly indicated by “eh,”[111] together with something of the guttural or chuckling accompaniment of this in the sound of laughter. What humour does undoubtedly restrain is any tendency in laughter which smacks of the brute and the bully in man. He floats idly and fantastically on the top of the literature of his age; his renowned and almost forgotten namesake has nearly sunk to the bottom of his. Now, we Americans are impatient of detail: we like to do things in a large way and then let them take care of themselves. And as for you who have it, you surely have not only a fundamental qualification for librarianship, but that which will make, and does make, of you better men and women. ‘And bade the lovely scenes at distance hail.’ I used to apply this line to the distant range of hills in a paltry landscape, which however had a tender vernal tone and a dewy freshness. This is certainly what we find. In this way particular standards of locality and of social group begin to count less in our laughter. _No._ 13.—_Admitted_ 1798. The history and the authorities which we can cite are certain ancient characters, scarcely understood by many, and explained by some old Indians, sons of the priests of their gods, who alone knew how to read and expound them, and who were believed in and revered as much as the gods themselves, etc.[224]” We have here the positive statement that these hieroglyphic inscriptions were used by the priests for recording their national history, and that by means of them they preserved the recollection of events which took place in a very remote past. As long as the practice existed, it was therefore necessary to invest it with every solemnity, and to guard it with penalties that would obviate some of its disadvantages. It was from thence that Homer, Archilochus, Stesichorus, Simonides, Sappho, Anacreon, derived their birth.

Dying to in fit. Yet the range of jocosity inspired by respect for mere newness, on the value of which reason has had nothing to say, is evidently limited. c. I need not make long quotations from a work so well-known as his _Charakteristik der hauptsachlichsten Typen des Sprachbaues_, one section of which, about thirty pages in length, is devoted to a searching and admirable presentation of the characteristics of the incorporative plan as shown in American languages. Every human being is distinguished from every other human being, both numerically, and characteristically. 3. He should have the complete command, not only over his countenance, but over his limbs and motions. Now I need not waste time in arguing here that this process can not be made to apply universally or be used indefinitely. THE ORDEAL OF THE BALANCE. that such a lovely form Could brave so dread and fierce a storm, That one so beautiful and frail Could bide the harsh and bitter gale; And she who angels might have kept In hallowed watches while she slept, Is pillowed on the sandy shore, Her lullaby the waters’ roar: And frowning skies in sorrow spread Their canopy around her head. I know that the condition is primarily stated the other way around. But he imitates the work of a divine artist, which can never be equalled. Laughter is not, however, always of this reflex form. The result is to fix the public mind on the excellence of shoes and both Smith and Jones sell more of them than under the old method. If they are opposite or different, the game will go on miserably, and human society must be at all times in the highest degree of disorder. Landscape-painting is free from these tormenting dilemmas and embarrassments. It is a sedate, but steady and faithful attachment to a few well-tried and well-chosen companions; in the choice of whom he is not guided by the giddy admiration of shining accomplishments, but by the sober esteem of modesty, discretion, and good conduct. Nature indeed, appears to have bestowed her favours with no sparing hand to render it a delightful retreat for the invalid—or those who require a relaxation from the noise and bustle of a city life—and for those who are desirous to prosecute their studies with ease and comfort, almost amounting to enchantment. We submitted to labour, in order to avoid the greater shame and pain of poverty, and we exposed ourselves to danger and to death in defence of our liberty and property, the means and instruments of pleasure and happiness; or in defence of our country, in the safety of which our own was necessarily comprehended. In nearly all of them, he says, some important structure, such as a large artery, is close to the surface and would be liable to injury if the skin were penetrated. This is a state of incomplete sleep, wherein several organs are watching. Other forces lying equally deep may not improbably co-operate. But that this fitness, this happy contrivance of any production of art, should often be more valued, than the very end for which it was intended; and that the exact adjustment of the means for attaining any conveniency or pleasure, should frequently be more regarded, than that very conveniency or pleasure, in the attainment of which their whole merit would seem to consist, has not, so far as I know, been yet taken {159} notice of by any body. They illustrate the crankiness, the eccentricity, which frequently affects writers outside of the Latin traditions, and which such a critic as Arnold should certainly have rebuked. If their work had been that of the musician or the artist! Those exalted stations may, no doubt, be completely degraded by vice and folly. Rules and precautions may, no doubt, be applied to counteract the excesses and overt demonstrations of any such characteristic infirmity; but still the disease will be in the mind, an impediment, not a help to virtue. This pre-determination in the blood has its caprices dying to fit in too, and wayward as well as obstinate fits. Possibly, however, this would be a mistake, for an occasional word keeps workers alive and in good humor where absolute silence is not necessary. The different accounts which have been given of the nature of virtue, or of the temper of mind which constitutes the excellent and praise-worthy character, may be reduced to three different classes. Sense (that is, that sort of sense which consists in pretension and a claim to superiority) is shewn, not in things that are plain and clear, but in deciding upon doubts and difficulties; the greater the doubt, therefore, the greater must be the dogmatism and the consequential airs of those who profess to settle points beyond the reach of the vulgar; nay, to increase the authority of such persons, the utmost stress must be laid on the most frivolous as well as ticklish questions, and the most unconscionable absurdities have always had the stoutest sticklers, and the most numerous victims. When custom, however, has established particular rules of building, provided they are not absolutely unreasonable, it is absurd to think of altering them for others which are only equally good, or even for others which, in point of elegance and beauty, have naturally some little advantage over them. In this consists the difference between the character of a miser and that of a person of exact oeconomy and assiduity. The most ferocious patriot never stated it as a serious question, Whether faith ought to be kept with public enemies?–Whether faith ought to be kept with rebels? This was intolerable. At Mundsley, they are found in the cliff. abolished it in cases of contested estates, and substituted the wager of battle, on account of the enormous perjury which it occasioned.[191] In England, a more sweeping denunciation, declaring its abolition and replacing it with the vulgar ordeal, is found in the confused and contradictory compilation known as the laws of Henry I.[192] We have already seen, from instances of later date, how little influence these efforts had in eradicating a custom so deeply rooted in the ancestral prejudices of all the European races. OBSERVATION V. Why should there not be the same taste in morals as in pictures or poems? Nowhere is this more graphically apparent than in Russia, whose kaleidoscopic upheavals have baffled all prophets. We read that in the Middle Ages, when local differences of dress dying to fit in and speech were so much more marked than now, satires on people of particular localities were not uncommon—though probably much more than a perception of the laughably odd was involved in these rather fierce derisions.[228] The immediate utility of this mirthful quizzing of other sets would, like that carried out by one savage tribe on another, consist in the preservation of the characteristics of one’s own set. A painted cloth, the work of some laborious Dutch artist, so curiously shaded and coloured as to represent the pile and softness of a woollen one, might derive some merit from its resemblance even to the sorry carpet which now {408} lies before me. It is only when laughter grows immoderate that there is a marked addition of other features, _viz._, the strong contraction of the muscles about the eyes leading to frowning, and the shedding of tears. ‘Is it the same in pictures?’ I confess it is, with all but those from Titian’s hand. But to preserve and to increase his esteem, is an interest which the greatest mind does not think unworthy of its attention. One object was to give as little offence as possible to ‘the powers that be’—to lie by, to trim, to shuffle, to wait for events, to be severe on our own errors, just to the merits of a prosperous adversary, and not to throw away the scabbard or make reconciliation hopeless. voila de la pervenche!’ with which all Europe has rung; or by the beginning of the last of the ‘Reveries of a Solitary Walker,’ ‘Aujourd’hui jour de Paques fleuries, il y a precisement cinquante ans de ma premiere connaissance avec Madame de Warens.’ But it is very possible our lively Anacreon does not understand these long-winded retrospects; and agrees with his friend Lord Byron, who professed never to feel any thing seriously for more than a day! The humorous remark may be but a momentary diversion of the attention, a playful side-glance, in a serious argument. How many of our valuable social institutions would have been built up if the beginners had been keenly alive to the absurd aspects of the bunglings which are wont to characterise first attempts? Johnson! C. He knew that as far as I was able I would reply truthfully to any question he might care to ask. The conclusion is irresistible and obvious to any one not blinded by religious prejudice that whether the object of faith is real or false the result attained will be the same in either case. Compare your expenditures with your circulation. Hence it has been inferred that my real, substantial interest in any thing must be derived in some indirect manner from the impression of the object itself, as if that could have any sort of communication with my present feelings, or excite any interest in my mind but by means of the imagination, which is naturally affected in a certain manner by the prospect of future good or evil. {133b} Whatever influences prevail externally, they must in all cases, sane and insane, be counteracted and modified by internal influences. The principles were essentially oppugnant, and the contest between them was prolonged and confused, for neither party could in all cases recognize the ultimate result of the minuter points involved, though each was fully alive to the broad issues of the struggle.